Consumerism social media (Sidani et al. 2016). Overall, If

Consumerism  is economically manifested in the chronic purchasing of new goods and services

Consumerism interferes with the workings of society by replacing the normal common-sense desire for an adequate supply of life’s necessities, community life, a stable family and healthy lifestyle.

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Consumerism sets each person against themselves in an endless quest for the attainment of material things or imaginary world conjured up and made possible by things yet to be purchased. Social norms have the important function of determining what is acceptable and what is unacceptable in a society – they are rules that guide society (Macionis, 1993). Social media posts can have an impact on how people view nutrition—and even on what they pack in their lunch boxes and set on the dinner table. In fact, social messages around healthy relationships with food are more imperative than ever: A new study published in the Journal of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics showed that young adults aged 19–32 who spent the most time on social media were more than twice as likely to report eating concerns compared with peers who spent less time on social media (Sidani et al. 2016). Overall, If these things are put into place society can begin to acknowledge the problems with negative advertisements and unhealthy lifestyles by promoting more positive images.

How Society Affects What We Eat

There are many issues in the world and one of them that affects everybody on a global scale would be how society affects what people eat. Society plays a huge role in our lives by controlling our every move. Our actions are judged based on what we see on television shows, commercials, advertisements, and as well as social media. Three key things that society uses to affect what we eat would be Consumerism, Social Norms, and Social Media. Through these outlets, we as people are put against ourselves and other people. We change what we eat based on social stereotypes and appearances of the people we consider icons, heroes and people we strive to be just like. This creates issues for us because there are many eating disorders that are associated with this like obesity, anorexia nervosa, bulimia nervosa, binge eating, and purging. These eating disorders play huge roles in our lives and are very difficult to stop and treat. It is very important to point out these constituents of the main issues that we have with society and how it affects what we eat.

Consumerism

Consumerism is economically manifested in the chronic purchasing of new goods and services. It is also a social ideology that encourages the acquisition of good and services in ever-increasing amounts. This includes commercials and advertisements to reach its consumer targets. Consumerism is used to describe the tendency of people to identify strongly with products or services they consume, especially those with big name brands for luxury cars, designer clothes, food products. Consumerism can really hurt the consumer in the way that they sacrifice time in order to fulfill specific needs. Consumerism interferes with the workings of society by replacing the normal common-sense desire for an adequate supply of life’s necessities, community life, a stable family and healthy lifestyle. Consumerism sets each person against themselves in an endless quest for the attainment of material things or imaginary world conjured up and made possible by things yet to be purchased. Weight training, body augmentation, and diet centers are examples of people turning themselves into human consumer goods more suited for the “marketplace” than living in a healthy balanced society. The influx of technology, advertising, images in the media and changes within modern cultural values play a big role in the psychological evolution of consumers in the food service industry.

Social Norms

Food choices are based on many factors, and a new study in the journal of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics explores the degree to which environment and social norms affect what we eat. Social norms have the important function of determining what is acceptable and what is unacceptable in a society – they are rules that guide society (Macionis, 1993). The thin ideal may be considered the current Western idealized social norm for bodies; whereas obesity is commonly considered a deviant body form (Drury et al., 2002). Social control is the way in which a society maintains obedience and adherence to social norms and how a society eliminates or seeks to minimize deviance (Conrad and Schneider, 1980). We eat differently when we are with other people compared with when we eat alone. Our dietary choices also tend to converge with those of our close social connections. Peer’s approval is considered the most important to some individuals and that is a big reason we eat the things the way we do, and it affects a certain way we eat as well. Norms of appropriate eating are set by the behavior of other people, but also shared cultural expectations and environmental cues. We are more likely to follow an eating norm if it is perceived to be relevant based on social comparison. According to the Huffington Post, examining data from 15 studies that observed food intake and food choice, the study’s researchers confirmed that people eat more when others are around them are eating more, and that they eat less when they believe smaller portions are the norm. People choose food types based on what they perceive to be is a social norm. Social norms feed off of individuals desire to “fit in” or to identify with a certain group of people and to gain social approval.

Social Media

Another key component to this is social media. Social media is websites and applications that enable users to create and share content or to participate in social networking. There are a number of food blogs, food forums and food groups online. While these online trends can be regarded as harmless and uncontroversial, there are much more serious and can have negative occurrences. Social media posts can have an impact on how people view nutrition—and even on what they pack in their lunch boxes and set on the dinner table. In fact, social messages around healthy relationships with food are more imperative than ever: A new study published in the Journal of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics showed that young adults aged 19–32 who spent the most time on social media were more than twice as likely to report eating concerns compared with peers who spent less time on social media (Sidani et al. 2016). Our perception of food is being influenced by online trends. This can lead to people becoming malnourished in order to get a certain look that they see on social media. People are convinced by the media to consume certain things to be sexier, healthier, smarter, less depressed and people buy into it. Most media promotes sugar intake and unhealthy stuff. They promote standard stereotypes, on issues like when you should to eat or how you should eat something. Sometimes, the media also promotes healthy styles, however the majority of the influences is on the wrong side. They affect our food choices by associating a particular food with a positive feeling or emotion. For example, a company wants you to buy their cereal for your kids, so they will try to convince you that a caring mother would buy their cereal. Advertisement is the biggest thing that gets people to change the way they feel about themselves.

 

Solutions

The solution to this problem is to promote healthier lifestyles and healthy food choices and to put those images into commercials and advertisements on social media and on our television screens. Obesity would be on decline as well as the eating disorders like anorexia nervosa, bulimia nervosa, and binge eating. If we do this we can potentially lead others to follow a healthy lifestyle and prevent those food stereotypes that follow us when we decide to eat.

 

Conclusion

Overall, If these things are put into place society can begin to acknowledge the problems with negative advertisements and unhealthy lifestyles by promoting more positive images. Positive images of people eating healthy may lead us to a more healthier earth and getting rid of all of the eating disorders that affect a lot of people.