Introduction guilty. This lack of courage can be explained

Introduction

This film is a good example of many social psychology
theories. This taut,evoking movie, showed a group of people who are jurors who
must had decide the guilt or innocence of a trial crime murder. The first vote
of eleven people out of eleven was guilty. As they go a through an intense discussion
they end up as a not-guilty decision. After analysis of film the main
highlights are comes under social psychology theories stated as conformity,
attitude change and group process.

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Conformity

Conformity from social influence is showed or portrayed
within the initial moments of the film. Initially the jury room was calm and
agreed to guilty then heated debate is prohibited by first vote. This vote,
taken publicly, was liable to establish social influence, a part of social
influence, or conformity caused by a fear of visible deviations. As all the
jurors gave their vote initially, the hesitation is obvious in many of the
eleven jurors who voted guilty. This lack of courage can be explained as weak a
firmly held belief or opinion showed by the guilty majority’s people influence.

Two of them jurors people, a particularly not racisable
individual and a often ill, prejudiced man, urges to normalized social
influence. The man who change unpredictably quickly support his position when
he blame “of course he is guilty” before the vote was taken. The often ill man
cry out suddenly after the vote and Henry Fonda’s deviation, “there’s always
has to be one.”  So basically these two men
tried to control the power of a normalized social influence because they wanted
to show that a guilty vote is absolutely appropriate.conformity based on others
views is explained by some given time limits or constraints. The basic part of
a jury apart from philosophical arguments is one of the problem is time
pressure. The courts are have too much cases to justice. So this film follows
conformity views of social behaviour