The hand shaped bruise on her arm. She will

The novice nurses are defined as newly graduated and licensed nurses and they are anticipated to be equal to or slightly less than 20 in number. The primary objective of this pilot project is to determine the impact of implementation of an IPV standardized patient/educational experience on nurse confidence levels as well as perceptions and attitudes regarding screening for and detection of IPV.  As the system’s retention rate for these novice nurses  is 95%, it is proposed that this experience has the potential promote change throughout the system. These novice nurses will be asked to participate in a standardized patient experience and will be provided with a standardized patient scenario, which will take place in a hospital room simulation center at UMSRH.  In this scenario, the standardized patient (SP), a gravida 2, para 1 female who is estimated to be a week past her due date will have information in her record which will include missed visits, recent falls and being kicked by a horse. This female SP will have a bruise on her cheek and a hand shaped bruise on her arm. She will be accompanied by a second SP acting as her controlling male spouse. The object of this experience is to recognize that the female SP is a potential victim of IPV and that the nurse would address this appropriately with the patient. The intended result is not completion of the assessment, but rather provision of a hands-on realistic experience for assimilating the information that will be provided during the educational component.  The implementation of this experience in the nurse’s work environment and practical solutions for the hospital’s setting will facilitate learning After all nurses have completed the SP experience they will meet to discuss the experience and will receive IPV related education. A meta-analysis of 22 health care providers studies regarding resource and personal barriers to screening cited the most frequent resource barriers were time constraint, lack of knowledge, education or training regarding screening, and inadequate follow-up resources (Sprague et al., 2012). Nurses can help identify and intervene with patients experiencing IPV if they are aware of and understand its forms, causes, prevalence, effects and manifestations, and are also aware of their own attitudes (Ali, McGarry, & Dhingra, 2016). Ali et al. (2016) also recommends that nurses should also be aware of the organizations’ policies and available services. This project will be conducted ethically through principles that protect human subjects and that are consistent with high quality clinical practices. PICO In novice nurses at a rural healthcare system, does the implementation of  IPV screening education through use of a standardized patient experience impact nurse confidence levels as well as perceptions and attitudes regarding screening for and detection of IPV?ConclusionEvidence Based Practice is the thorough and thoughtful use of recent best evidence along with clinical expertise to make health care decisions, including implementation of practices (Titler, 2008). By incorporating into practice what is learned from research, safe and well informed patient care can be provided   (Titler, 2008). This paper discusses the plan and potential impact of implementing an  IPV screening education through use of a standardized patient experience on nurse confidence levels as well as their perceptions and attitudes regarding screening for and detection of IPV.